All information Copyright, Cranfield University © 2018

Citation: To use information from this web resource in your work, please cite this as follows:
Cranfield University 2018. The Soils Guide. Available: www.landis.org.uk. Cranfield University, UK. Last accessed 23/02/2018

0711d MARTOCK

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Soil and site characteristics

Slowly permeable seasonally waterlogged stoneless silty over clayey and clayey soils over siltstone or shale. Some similar soils with slowly permeable subsoils and slight waterlogging. Landslips and associated surface irregularities on slopes.

Geology

Mesozoic and Palaeozoic siltstone and shale

Cropping and Land Use

Dairying on permanent and short term grassland; some fruit.

Component soil series

Subgroup Series name Percentage WRB 2006 link
7.11 MARTOCK 50% Eutric Albic Luvic Stagnosols
7.11 STANWAY 15% Eutric Albic Luvic Stagnosols
7.12 DALE 10% Clayic Eutric Stagnosols

Covers 157 km2 in England and Wales

Soilscapes Classification

18
Slowly permeable seasonally wet slightly acid but base-rich loamy and clayey soils

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0711d MARTOCK

Detailed Description

Martock association consists of silty over clayey and fine silty stagnogley soils in Jurassic and Paleozoic siltstone and shale. It is present on the lower part of the Cotswold scarp in Gloucestershire and Avon on Liassic sediments and, in the vale below, over Paleozoic rocks. It extends into east Somerset and parts of west Dorset, again on silty Liassic strata. The principal soil, Martock series, is a greyish fine silty over clayey stagnogley soil with much ochreous mottling. Associated soils reflect facies changes in the underlying sediments. The similar Stanway series is fine silty throughout and Dale series is a non-swelling clay soil. In Gloucestershire and Avon much of the Cotswold scarp is affected by landslipping.

The association incorporates soils mapped previously as the Long Load and Martock series. The former Long Load series is now divided between Dale series where clayey and the re-defined Martock series where silty over clayey. The drier, less gleyed, part of the Martock series as formerly defined and mapped is now classed with the fine silty Curtisden series. Dale soils occur in Somerset and Dorset on gently undulating land often along the junction between the Lower and Middle Lias. Around Evercreech and further north, from Bath to Cheltenham, much of the scarp is landslipped and very undulating and locally the soil pattern is very complex. In the Berkeley Vale the association occurs on Silurian silty shales and Cambrian siltstones and there was formerly mapped as the Speller series.


Soil Water Regime

Martock soils are waterlogged for long periods in winter (Wetness Class IV) unless effectively drained (Wetness Class III); springs and land irregularities limit the scope for improving the Cotswold scarp. Run-off of winter rain is appreciable and mostly at shallow depth, especially on sloping land. In summer, profile available water is adequate to meet the needs of cereals, but these crops are rarely grown; for grass, the soils are slightly droughty.

Cropping and Land Use

Because all the constituent soils are moisture retentive with slowly permeable subsoils, they remain wet for long periods, so that cultivations and grazing are restricted even after appropriate drainage measures. Dairy farming is the main land use on improved ley grassland in the vale, but beef cattle, sheep or dairy herd followers are kept on permanent grassland on the steep or landslipped scarp. Some fodder crops are also grown and parts of the more accessible scarp have been improved and ploughed-up for ley grassland and cereals. Cider apple and perry pear orchards were formerly common on these soils but many have been grubbed and replanting has tended to be on more favourable soils, for example on the Curtisden association.

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0711d MARTOCK

Typical Landscapes

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All information Copyright, Cranfield University © 2018

Citation: To use information from this web resource in your work, please cite this as follows:
Cranfield University 2018. The Soils Guide. Available: www.landis.org.uk. Cranfield University, UK. Last accessed 23/02/2018