All information Copyright, Cranfield University © 2018

Citation: To use information from this web resource in your work, please cite this as follows:
Cranfield University 2018. The Soils Guide. Available: www.landis.org.uk. Cranfield University, UK. Last accessed 15/08/2018

0572g DUNNINGTON HEATH

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Soil and site characteristics

Reddish coarse and fine loamy over clayey soils with slowly permeable subsoils and slight seasonal waterlogging.

Geology

Drift over Permo-Triassic reddish mudstone

Cropping and Land Use

Cereals, sugar beet and potatoes.

Component soil series

Subgroup Series name Percentage WRB 2006 link
5.72 DUNNINGTON HEATH 50% Chromic Endostagnic Luvisols
5.72 WHIMPLE 20% Chromic Endostagnic Luvisols

Covers 169 km2 in England and Wales

Soilscapes Classification

8
Slightly acid loamy and clayey soils with impeded drainage

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0572g DUNNINGTON HEATH

Detailed Description

Stagnogleyic argillic brown earths of the Dunnington Heath and Whimple series occur on Triassic mudstone where it is covered by thin loamy Head or glaciofluvial drift. Dunnington Heath soils are found on gently sloping or level lower slopes where brown coarse loamy upper horizons containing quartzite pebbles pass abruptly but at irregular depth into a reddish brown clayey and slowly permeable subsoil. Whimple soils otherwise similar, but with fine loamy upper horizons, are randomly mixed with Dunnington Heath soils on gentle slopes but are dominant on moderate slopes. Whimple soils often merge upslope into clayey reddish Worcester series.

The Dunnington Heath association is extensive on the west-facing slopes of the Soar valley north of Loughborough and south of the Trent between Kingston on Soar and East Bridgford. There are minor occurrences in south Derbyshire, eastern Nottinghamshire and near Leamington Spa. In total the association covers almost 125 km² of land. Most delineations include small patches of deep coarse loamy drift carrying Wick and Arrow soils, and some, south of Nottingham, contain small patches of till with Flint or Salwick soils. In places, particularly between East Bridgford and Cotgrave, some of the drift is derived from thin sandstone skerries within the mudstones. Bromsgrove and Staunton soils occur occasionally on these sandstones. Brockhurst series, often occurs in valley bottoms and other low places, sometimes adjacent to narrow strips of alluvial Fladbury and Compton soils.

The association covers about 3 km² of land near Knaith, south of Gainsborough and near Newton on Trent in Lincolnshire. Here Dunnington Heath series is dominant but Whimple soils cover between a third and a half of the ground. Soils similar to Dunnington Heath series but overlying greenish mudstone also occur. There are minor inclusions of Ollerton and Newport series on deep patches of sand.

The association only occurs on 5 km² of land near Epworth in the Isle of Axholme and at Holme on Spalding Moor. Near Epworth it is on gently sloping ground adjoining blown sand and consists mainly of the Dunnington Heath series along with Whimple soils and the Wick and Newport series. At Holme-on-Spalding-Moor the association occurs on a steep-sided hill with a capping of glacial sand and gravel and with blown sand at its base. Here the association is formed equally of the Worcester, Dunnington Heath and Newport series with a few profiles of the Kexby and Everingham series at the bottom of the hill.


Soil Water Regime

In Whimple and Dunnington Heath soils, upper horizons are relatively permeable but drainage is impeded by slowly permeable subsoils, causing temporary winter waterlogging. On level or concave sites, or where the clay subsoils are close to the surface, the soils are seasonally waterlogged (Wetness Class III), but elsewhere and where the loamy horizons are thicker, they are only occasionally waterlogged (Wetness Class II). Both soils, particularly Dunnington Heath series, respond to drainage which reduces the duration of winter waterlogging substantially. These soils can accept excess winter rain and delay run-off during wet periods.

Cropping and Land Use

Climate and soil characteristics combine to give the Dunnington Heath association flexibility in use and a wide range of crops, but mainly cereals, is grown. Both Dunnington Heath and Whimple soils have adequate opportunity for spring field work in all but wet years so root crops can be sown, and the late return to field capacity permits the harvesting of root crops with risk of soil structural damage only on the heavier Whimple soils. Available water capacities, ranging from 110 to 150 mm, fall slightly short of arable crop water needs. Irrigation of drought sensitive crops such as potatoes is therefore desirable for maximum yields. The soils are slightly droughty for all crops and moderately droughty for grass. Both Whimple and Dunnington Heath soils are suitable for direct drilling of winter cereals but are less suited for spring sowings. Periodic liming is required to maintain pH; potassium and phosphorus status depends on past fertilizer practice though phosphorus is usually retained in a readily available form. Manganese deficiency occurs locally associated with poor physical conditions or high organic matter content.

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0572g DUNNINGTON HEATH

Typical Landscapes

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All information Copyright, Cranfield University © 2018

Citation: To use information from this web resource in your work, please cite this as follows:
Cranfield University 2018. The Soils Guide. Available: www.landis.org.uk. Cranfield University, UK. Last accessed 15/08/2018